Sespe Wilderness

Geology:

The Sespe Wilderness lies within the Transverse Mountain Ranges. The USGS has information on the geological setting of the mountain range province here. More specifically, the Sespe Wilderness and Sespe Condor Sanctuary are mostly within the Topatopa Mountains and foothills. The  Topatopa Range is composed of Oligocene-Eocene age sandstones of the Juncal, Matilija, Cozy Dell, and Coldwater Formations. The uplifting of the Topatopa Mountains was chiefly caused by the San Cayetano fault, which was initiated at 1.9 Ma.

The fossils in the Sespe Wilderness are incredibly common and can be found on the trail and in the abundant boulders nearby. Marine shells can be seen exposed on the outside of eroded and smooth boulders, and on the surface of the rotated strata of the foothills.

Paleontology:

A variety of marine invertebrates are common in the area, including mussels, oysters, cephalopods, and other shelled organisms.

Works Cited:

MCKAY, HANNAH. QUATERNARY STRATIGRAPHY AND GEOLOGIC EVOLUTION OF OJAI AND UPPER OJAI VALLEYS, WESTERN TRANSVERSE RANGES, CALIFORNIA. P.2011

 

Jacalitos Creek

image069Paleontology:

Fauna found in the area include three species of Echinodermata, two Cirripedia, Pelecy- poda, and 29 Gastropoda. Many new gastropod species were discovered in Jacalitos Creek including  Attralium arnoldi, Chrysodomus coalingemis, Fissuridea subelliplica, Murex perangulatui, Natica (Neverita) orbieularis, Trophon magister, Turritella nova; Pelecypoda : Mytilus ketvi, Tivela trigonalis.

Works Cited:

Jorgen O. Nomland, “Fauna from the Lower Pliocene at Jacalitos Creek and Waltham Canyon, Fresno County, California,” (North American Paleontology 1916) <http://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2FGEO%2FGEO6_3_08%2FS0016756800206043a.pdf&code=143cdf352a36a8ead990e75cf703ee45>

Shell Creek

Geology of the Area:

The area contains Cenezoic marine strata, which is part of the Temblor Formation.

The Fossils:

In the cliffside just off the road are clams, sand dollars, and Oysters, likely dating to the Miocene or Pliocene epoch.

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