Where to Find Marine Fauna Fossils near Coalinga, CA

Fossil Sand Dollars, Clams, and Coral.

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Where to Find Fossils at Surfer’s Knoll

Geology: Very similar to that of other Ventura fossil sites such as:

Coal Point: link

Rincon Point: link

Ojai Trails: link

Sespe Wilderness: link

Paleontology: Black fossil bone about 14-15 inches long, which was found in a layer of sand that was cut into by the waves, was submitted on November 18th, 2016.

Other: If you have any input that would help identify the fossil, feel free to contact us and we will update this find.

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Ultimate Guide to Finding Fossils at Point Loma

Geology:

Point Loma is part of the Point Loma Formation, near the coastline of San Diego. According to the second citation, “The massive, ungraded sandstones in the Point Loma Formation have sharp upper and lower contacts, thick lenses of mudstone clasts, and common load-deformation structures, suggesting deposition largely by grain-flow processes.”

Paleontology:

The Upper Cretaceous strata in the Point Loma formation contain abundant trace fossils of the species Qphiomorpha and Thalassinoides, which suggest that the area was a shallow sea during the Cretaceous Period.

Directions:

According to The Fossil Forum, “Towards San Diego, get off at the Tecolate Road/Sea World exit. Proceed west on Sea World Drive — past Sea World, it becomes Sunset Cliffs Blvd. Drive to the end of Sunset Cliffs and park in the lot for Sunset Cliffs Park. Look along the top of the sea cliff.”

Works Cited:

Gary Kindel, “Fossil Collecting Sites in North America,” (Digital Rockhound’s Companion Site 2009) http://www.digitalrockhound.blogspot.com

Philip Kern et al, “Trace Fossils and Bathymetry of the Upper Cretaceous Point Loma Formation, San Diego, California,” (San Diego State U, Rice U 1974) http://gsabulletin.gsapubs.org/content/85/6/893.abstract

Guide to Finding Fossils at Rincon Point

Directions:

According to this page’s first citation, ” from LA, travel north on the Ventura Freeway (101) towards Ventura. Travel about an hour, north towards Santa Barbara. Exit onto Highway 150 (towards Lake Casitas) and park immediately after leaving Route 101. The fossils are found along the freeway offramp and up the hill above.”

Geology of the Area:

Rincon Point is a famous surfing spot on the border of Santa Barbara and Ventura County. The fossils of Rincon Point are found off a freeway cut that exposes 16 different layers of Santa Barbara Formation strata. Santa Barbara County was underwater for most of Earth’s history, but slowly rose to the surface during the Cenozoic Era, especially as a result of the Miocene dated tectonic movements that created the San Andreas Fault.

Fossils:

Pliocene-Pleistocene dated fossils are abundant in the sediments off the freeway. The fossils are marine fauna including invertebrates such as bryozoa, mollusks, gastropods, and Pecten.

Other Fossil Sites Nearby:

Coal Point: link

Ojai Trails: link

Sespe Wilderness: link

Surfer’s Knoll: link

Works Cited:

Gary Kindel, “Fossil Collecting Sites in North America,” (Digital Rockhound’s Companion Site 2009) http://www.digitalrockhound.blogspot.com

“US and Canadian Fossil Sites — Data for California” http://donaldkenney.x10.mx/STATES/CA.HTM

“Offshore Geology of Santa Barbara County” (County of Santa Barbara Planning and Development ) http://www.sbcountyplanning.org

Where to Find Fossils at Coal Point, Isla Vista

Geology: The fossiliferous layers are part of an unnamed Pleistocene formation. Once you park, walk down to the beach and look for the sedimentary rocks on the beach cliff. However, the geology of the area should be similar to the Monterey formation which contains both Gaviota Beach, and Jalama Beach.

Fossils: The layers of sandstone contain marine assemblages from the Pleistocene epoch.

Other Fossil Sites Nearby:

Rincon Point: link

Ojai Trails: link

Sespe Wilderness: link

Surfer’s Knoll: link

Where to Find Fossils in Jack’s Peak County Park

Geology: According to the USGS, “Geophysical data and sea floor samples collected from the continental shelf and slope between Ano Nuevo Point and Point Sur, California indicate that the Monterey Bay region has had a complex late Cenozoic tectonic history“, meaning that it is difficult to easily date the fossils based on location. See the Further Reading to learn more about the geology of the Monterey Bay region.

Fossils: Fossils containing small leaves and shells are in shale a hundred yards down the trail from the west parking lot.

Further Reading/Works Cited:

Gary Greene, “Geology of the Monterey Bay region, California” (USGS 1977) https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr77718