Capitola Beach

Geology of the Beach:

The yellow brown sandstones that contain the fossils are part of the Purisma formation. Collecting is best at low tide, when the outcroppings are most exposed. 2429587379_250f7320ef.jpg

Paleontology of the Fossils:

The fossils originate from the Pliocene epoch of the Neogene period. Bivalves, gastropods, sea urchins, crabs, marine mammal bones from whales and seals can be found. Shark teeth have also been recovered from the beach, but are rare.

An extensive photo gallery of the fossils common at Capitola Beach can be found here: http://nextcenturyimages.com/nature/capitolafossils2307/index.html 

Works Cited:

“CA Capitola,” (Paleontica Fossiel August 2012) <http://english.fossiel.net/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=506>

Jacalitos Creek

image069Paleontology:

Fauna found in the area include three species of Echinodermata, two Cirripedia, Pelecy- poda, and 29 Gastropoda. Many new gastropod species were discovered in Jacalitos Creek including  Attralium arnoldi, Chrysodomus coalingemis, Fissuridea subelliplica, Murex perangulatui, Natica (Neverita) orbieularis, Trophon magister, Turritella nova; Pelecypoda : Mytilus ketvi, Tivela trigonalis.

Works Cited:

Jorgen O. Nomland, “Fauna from the Lower Pliocene at Jacalitos Creek and Waltham Canyon, Fresno County, California,” (North American Paleontology 1916) <http://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2FGEO%2FGEO6_3_08%2FS0016756800206043a.pdf&code=143cdf352a36a8ead990e75cf703ee45>